Queen Anne High School

When the Queen Anne High School was built, America was conflicted over the purpose of high school. Public education was seen as a possible cure for America’s social ills. Some believed there should be an emphasis on liberal arts, while others wanted to use the system to assimilate a surging immigration population, and another push was for vocational training.

In Queen Anne, the demand for a high school came from Seattle’s rapid population growth during the years following the Alaska Gold Rush. Between 1902 and 1910, Seattle’s total high school enrollment leapt from approximately 700 students to 4,500 students. Several elementary schools were constructed on Queen Anne Hill, and it was evident that a new high school would be needed. …Continue reading “Queen Anne High School”

The Yukevich House – 1811 8th Ave W

1811 8th Ave W, 2016This wasn’t their first new home project together, however they were expecting it to be their last. Mike and Kelly Yukevich broke ground on 1811 8th Ave W in 2009 while living in North Queen Anne.

As a Co-Founder of Shilshole Development, 2009 was also the year that Mike’s company completed The Residences at Nob Hill in Queen Anne at 2209 Nob Hill Ave N. With a goal to harmonize with the neighboring homes, Architect Michael G. Dooley (1962-2014) designed the Yukevich’s personal residence on 8th Ave W with a similar intention. Box beam ceilings, division of space by column topped half-walls, white trim work, bay windows, and subterranean garages are found at both Nob Hill and 8th Ave W. …Continue reading “The Yukevich House – 1811 8th Ave W”

Emily Inez Denny — Seattle Pioneer

Emily Inez Denny was born in Seattle in 1853. She was the first white child born in Seattle and the oldest child of pioneers David and Louisa Boren Denny.

Louisa, Madge, David, and Emily Denny ca. 1861

Inez and her sister Madge took classes at the Territorial University when it opened in 1860. Inez later recounted that each pupil had a small slate on which lessons were written, as paper was expensive and in short supply on the frontier. The girls cleaned their slates with a sponge attached to the slate by a string and water kept in a little bottle in their pockets. The boys, on the other hand, often didn’t bother with the sponge and water, but would spit on the slate or lick it off and dry it with a sleeve. …Continue reading “Emily Inez Denny — Seattle Pioneer”