Our newest city landmark: Edris Skinner Nurses Home

Queen Anne has a new City of Seattle landmark. On Wednesday, May 16, the Landmarks Preservation Board (LPB) voted to designate the Edris Skinner Nurses Home at the corner of Boston Street and First Avenue North a Seattle landmark. Congratulations to Brian Regan, the property owner and future developer of the block-long site, who prepared the nomination that you can find in the list here: http://www.seattle.gov/neighborhoods/programs-and-services/historic-preservation/landmarks#currentnomination. The decision now goes to the City Council which is sure to vote for designation.

Children's Hospital / Nurses Home
Edris Skinner Nurses Home as seen from First Avenue North

Although the society endorsed the nomination as meeting five designation criteria (see our email of May 15 posted at http://qahistory.org/endorsing-landmark-designation-of-edris-skinner-nurses-home/), the LPB decided that the home, built in 1923, only met criteria C and D. Since a building need meet only one of the five criteria to be designated a city landmark, there is no reason to object to the board’s logic in rejecting the reasons we gave for other criteria. It does seem noteworthy, however, that board chose not to acknowledge the building’s social significance and the often sexist attitudes towards women in health care work at the turn of the 20th century.

Endorsing Landmark Designation of Edris Skinner Nurses Home

The Queen Anne Historical Society continues its active support of the city’s landmark processes with this email sent May 15, 2018 to the Landmarks Preservation Board prior to its deliberation on May 16 of the designation of the Edris Skinner Nurses Home on the campus of the former Seattle Children’s Orthopedic Hospital once located on Queen Anne Hill.

Dear members of the Landmarks Preservation Board:

Due to unexpected conflicts and with apologies for the tardiness of this message, the Queen Anne Historical Society enthusiastically endorses the designation of the Edris Skinner Nurses Home which will be before the Landmarks Preservation Board tomorrow May 16, 2018. In our opinion the Edris Skinner Nurses Home meets five designation criteria. A, B, C, D. and F.

…Continue reading “Endorsing Landmark Designation of Edris Skinner Nurses Home”

Changing times, changing looks: The Wooden Stores at Sixth W. and W. Howe

1834 6th W. in 2017; southern window hidden.

The impact of Seattle’s streetcar lines on Queen Anne’s commercial development continues to be part of our daily lives. Even today, following the historic #24 streetcar route, the one that ran up the Counterbalance around a couple of corners and down Sixth to its terminus at W. McGraw, finds us still shopping in historic buildings all along the way. The active stores like Macrina Bakery, Top Pot Doughnuts or Molly Moon delight us still, but the abandoned ones, like the three at 1828, 1834 and 1900 6th Ave. W. at of W. Howe, draw my eye every day.

All three stores are on the east side of the wider street and were obviously built in response to the 1902 completion of the streetcar line. According to the city’s historic side sewer cards, the shop at 1828 connected to the sewer in 1909 while the one at 1834 on the southeastern corner of W. Howe tied up in 1910. The oldest of the three at 1900 6th Ave., connected in 1904 barely two years after the streetcar arrived. Oddly, we don’t learn the name of the shop owner until 1907. Unlike the great majority of the brick clad stores that survive today, these three are two-story wooden structures with at least one apartment over the shops. Fortunately, we have photographs of all three in 1937 and the early 1950s. The 1937 photos were snapped by an under-employed designer working for the Depression era Works Progress Administration. …Continue reading “Changing times, changing looks: The Wooden Stores at Sixth W. and W. Howe”