30 Years Touring Mount Pleasant Cemetery

Community on the Hill, “Staying on Queen Anne Forever.”

 

It comes as no surprise to the residents of Upper Uptown (a recently coined term designed by me to placate Uptowners who want to strip city maps, newspaper articles and the Queen Anne Historical Society of our historic name) that local historians revel in all the secrets buried at the Mount Pleasant Cemetery (700 W. Raye Street). The first tour’s organizers included Bob Frazier, Isabel Egglin, Del Loder, John Hennes and Kim Turner, all but Isabel, a Holocaust survivor, are Queen Anne High School graduates and members of the Queen Anne Historical Society. In 1997, the cemetery guides focused on “few good gravesites,” but they quickly escalated from visits to the gravesites of early Seattle movers and shakers like the Blaines, Clises, Bells or Clarence Bagley to those of ‘ordinary’ citizens, none of whom, according to this year’s tour leader Kim Turner, “is or was truly ordinary!” …Continue reading “30 Years Touring Mount Pleasant Cemetery”

How to designate a landmark: The Boyd Building

View from the northeast shows historic windows on upper floors and in the three southern bays.

 

Once upon a time in 1920, former Queen Anne resident, Frederick L. Boyd built the Boyd Building at 995 Westlake Ave. N. Just this spring, to the apparent dismay of its owners, the Boyd was designated a Seattle landmark. The story of the designation has fairy-tale qualities with a prince of a building and some strange goings on.  Coincidentally, it provides a good lesson about how historic buildings become designated landmarks.

It helps to know that this relatively simple warehouse/factory building sits close the shore of Lake Union on the eastern edge of Queen Anne in South Lake Union. You’ll find it facing generally north at the spot where 8th Ave. N. splits off from Westlake to heading south. Most of us know it as the American Meter & Appliance building. …Continue reading “How to designate a landmark: The Boyd Building”

Happy Birthday to the Fremont Bridge! Come and Get Your Souvenir!

The Fremont Bridge in 1936.

July 4, 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Lake Washington Ship Canal, the Ballard Locks and of our beloved Fremont Bridge.

On July 4th from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm, if they last that long, the Fremont Historical Society in cooperation with volunteers from the Queen Anne Historical Society will distribute souvenir cards commemorating the anniversary every time the bridge opens.