Bartell Mansion: 1517 11th Avenue West

George Bartell Sr. (1868-1956) established the nation’s oldest drugstore chain, originating in Seattle in 1890.  In 1900, he and his second wife Beatrice Shaffer Bartell (1879-1969) became the first residents of the house at 1517 11th Avenue West – constructed by the father of the bride, Fisk Shaffer (in partnership with Joseph A. Moncrieff) of Montana. Shaffer Moncrieff, Building Contractors also constructed the adjacent multi-unit residential project at 1511 11th Avenue West. 

George Henry Bartell Jr. (1916-2009) arrived two days after his parent’s 11th wedding anniversary. He and his older sister Amy Ellen (1906-1998) grew up in the house now known as “the Bartell Mansion.” They both attended West Queen Anne Elementary School and Queen Anne High School.   …Continue reading “Bartell Mansion: 1517 11th Avenue West”

320 West Kinnear Place: Matzen Residence

The Matzen residence at 320 West Kinnear Place was constructed in 1910 – 1911.  George Matzen was the owner and president of Matzen Manufacturing Company, a clothing manufacturer in Pioneer Square.  He and his wife Irene occupied the house on the south slope of Queen Anne from 1910 until sometime in the 1930s.  …Continue reading “320 West Kinnear Place: Matzen Residence”

Our Sweet Queen Anne Cottages

“At First Avenue West and West Garfield Street, these Craftsman bungalows are of minor significance individually.  As a group, they provide a rhythm and consistency of scale.” Steinbrueck and Nyberg

No one understood better than Victor Steinbrueck and his colleague Folke Nyberg how much Seattle or Queen Anne’s historic working-class housing defined the city. The six identical working-class Craftsman bungalows they referred to in their 1975 poster still stand on West Garfield Street between the alley and First Ave. W. Four of them face north on Garfield; one sits on First Avenue W. while the sixth one backs up to it from the alley. As Steinbrueck and Nyberg suggest, the historic value of buildings often lies more in the urban patterns they create than in their individual distinctiveness.

The pattern Steinbrueck and Folke captured.

In 1975, Victor Steinbrueck embarked on a project with Folke Nyberg and Historic Seattle to identify and publish a series of ten posters inventorying Seattle’s outstanding historic buildings. Queen Anne was lucky to get one of them. In fact, the Queen Anne Historical Society and its volunteers, some of whom are still active today (6/2018), worked on the project. Completing their survey in the early days of the American historic preservation movement, Steinbrueck and Nyberg were hell bent on recognizing that along with the high style buildings often favored by the movement, the vernacular ones were those that really defined a neighborhood’s historic character. The poster authors understood profoundly how a sense of place can give meaning to a community like ours. As Historic Seattle notes on its website, “Each inventory includes photographs and brief descriptions of common building types, significant buildings, and urban design elements.” …Continue reading “Our Sweet Queen Anne Cottages”