The Queen Anne Style – Our Neighborhood Namesake

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Ankeny House, 2003

Our Society is frequently asked, “why is our community called Queen Anne?” It does seem strange for a pioneer western city to name its most prominent geographical feature after a relatively obscure 18th century British monarch. The short answer is that we are not named after the Queen, but are in fact named for the architectural style of the first houses built up the south slope of our hill. The longer answer shows how centennials can shape our view of the world.

In the 1870s, in England, architect Richard Norman Shaw introduced the Queen Anne or Free Classic residential design. It was intended to evoke domestic architecture of some 200 years earlier. The British public loved it, perhaps tiring of the demands of empire and nostalgic for a simpler past. …Continue reading “The Queen Anne Style – Our Neighborhood Namesake”

Fred J. Rogers: Architect of Old World Charm

   

1930 Queen Anne Park house by Fred J. Rogers. Photo: Dianne Terry

Many years ago my husband and I were attracted to the curving streets and variety of charming home styles in Queen Anne Park on the north side of the hill. At that time we had no idea how many talented people were involved with this carefully planned development of English Tudors, bungalows, and Spanish and colonial revivals. It took us decades to discover Fred J. Rogers, the architect of many homes in this area and numerous neighborhoods in Seattle.

Rogers was born in Portland, Oregon in 1900. He apprenticed there in 1922-23 with A. E. Doyle, completed graduate studies at the University of Washington and worked with the Bebb & Gould architects in Seattle. After 1926 he worked in private practice as a residential designer, and many of his early homes were of the English Tudor Revival style. …Continue reading “Fred J. Rogers: Architect of Old World Charm”

170 Prospect St: Brace-Moriarty Residence

Lumberman John Stuart Brace (1861-1918) started his lumber business in Spokane in 1878 and moved to Seattle 10 years later with his family to work with his father in the mill industry. In 1890 he married Katherine Frankland Brace (1861-1924) and they had three girls and two boys.

In 1892 Brace served on the city council and three years later he became Superintendent for Western Mills. By 1899 the Brace & Hergert Mill Company was successfully operating at the intersection of Valley St and Terry Ave in South Lake Union, now a part of Lake Union Park.

In 1904 Brace commissioned a home to be designed by the Kerr and Rogers partnership. The home was built from old growth trees by his lumber company. As President of the Lake Washington Canal Association, Brace met with government officials and committees of business men, and directed the educational campaign in favor of the canal. In 1918 John Stuart Brace died in his home after a 3-month illness.

“A very patriotic, high type of citizen was Mr. Brace. I know of no man with whom I have come in contact within recent years that impressed me as being so broad, unselfish and fair-minded, nor one in whom more confidence could be placed. He was a splendid friend. Not alone for his work… but in many other ways was he a friend of the community. It is doubtful if the full measure of the community’s debt to him will ever be fully known.” Lawrence J. Colman

…Continue reading “170 Prospect St: Brace-Moriarty Residence”

Bartell Mansion: 1517 11th Avenue West

George Bartell Sr. (1868-1956) established the nation’s oldest drugstore chain, originating in Seattle in 1890.  In 1900, he and his second wife Beatrice Shaffer Bartell (1879-1969) became the first residents of the house at 1517 11th Avenue West – constructed by the father of the bride, Fisk Shaffer (in partnership with Joseph A. Moncrieff) of Montana. Shaffer Moncrieff, Building Contractors also constructed the adjacent multi-unit residential project at 1511 11th Avenue West. 

George Henry Bartell Jr. (1916-2009) arrived two days after his parent’s 11th wedding anniversary. He and his older sister Amy Ellen (1906-1998) grew up in the house now known as “the Bartell Mansion.” They both attended West Queen Anne Elementary School and Queen Anne High School.   …Continue reading “Bartell Mansion: 1517 11th Avenue West”