Seventh Church of Christ, Scientist – 2555 8th Ave W

Seventh Church of Christ, Scientist, 1941
Seventh Church of Christ, Scientist, 1941

On June 17, 2009, the (former) Seventh Church of Christ, Scientist located at 2555 8th Avenue West, designed by Harlan Thomas (Thomas & Grainger) in 1926, was designated a City of Seattle Landmark by unanimous vote of the Landmarks Board at their semi-monthly meeting. The landmark report was prepared and presented by Larry Johnson, AIA, principal of The Johnson Partnership, with the assistance of Queen Anne Historical Society Landmarks Preservation Committee members, Char Eggleston and Leanne Olson. Also in attendance were two granddaughters of architect Harlan Thomas (Koque Thomas Todd and Edith Williams Shuman) as well as Jay Kelly, Minister of the Seattle Church of Christ (current owners of the property). All ten board members present voted unanimously to approve the designation based on the building meeting three of the six designation criteria specified by the City of Seattle Landmarks ordinance. …Continue reading “Seventh Church of Christ, Scientist – 2555 8th Ave W”

Denny Log Cabin – Queen Anne Ave & Republican St

Denny Log Cabin, 1889
Denny Log Cabin, 1889

In 1889, the log cabin was built by carpenter Ed L. Lindsley for use by David L. Denny as his real estate office. For the construction of the log cabin, trees from the top of Queen Anne were cut, peeled and hauled down to the site. It was located on the southwest corner of Queen Anne Avenue and Republican Street. …Continue reading “Denny Log Cabin – Queen Anne Ave & Republican St”

Queen Anne Congregational Church – 1516 Queen Anne Ave

congregational-church
Congregational Church, undated

This large wooden structure stood on the spot where today’s KIRO TV tower stands. The Reverend Dr. Sydney Strong was its most notable minister, serving from 1908 to 1921. The Strong family, including son Tracy and radical daughter Anna Louise, lived at 508 Garfield St. In its later years the church was used as a YMCA building and Queen Anne High School students would hold “Hi-Y” meetings and play basketball in its large interior. It was torn down to make way for the TV tower, built in 1958.