The Yukevich House – 1811 8th Ave W

1811 8th Ave W, 2016This wasn’t their first new home project together, however they were expecting it to be their last. Mike and Kelly Yukevich broke ground on 1811 8th Ave W in 2009 while living in North Queen Anne.

As a Co-Founder of Shilshole Development, 2009 was also the year that Mike’s company completed The Residences at Nob Hill in Queen Anne at 2209 Nob Hill Ave N. With a goal to harmonize with the neighboring homes, Architect Michael G. Dooley (1962-2014) designed the Yukevich’s personal residence on 8th Ave W with a similar intention. Box beam ceilings, division of space by column topped half-walls, white trim work, bay windows, and subterranean garages are found at both Nob Hill and 8th Ave W. …Continue reading “The Yukevich House – 1811 8th Ave W”

Landmarks board to consider 1963 City Light building on Queen Anne

Futuristic design echoes World’s Fair aesthetic

In 1963, Seattle City Light built the Power Control Center, a modernist-style steel-reinforced concrete structure that has remained on Lower Queen Anne even as the neighborhood has changed.

But as new development gobbles up property, Nicole Demers-Changelo worries the oddly shaped relic could also be lost.

Demers-Changelo is an architect and transplant from New York, and has taken a liking to the former utility building. It’s not sleek like the current modern architecture. It’s more of a type, she said, a building that expresses the modern post-World War II ideal of showing its strength against the outside world. …Continue reading “Landmarks board to consider 1963 City Light building on Queen Anne”

Stimson-Griffiths House – 405 W Highland Drive

Stimson-Griffith House, 1905
Stimson-Griffiths House, 1905

Frederick Spencer Stimson was the manager of the Stimson Mill in Ballard and with his brother C.D. Stimson prospered in the lumber business. Fred bought this property on West Highland Drive with a dramatic view of the harbor and began planning an equally substantial house for his family. He liked the English style, as did his neighbors Albert S. Kerry, Harry W. Treat and Charles H. Black. All these men went shopping for an architect and chose Charles Bebb, who designed this three-story house with stucco and half-timbered upper floors rising above a fortress-like stone ground floor punctuated by shingled bays on the south side. The cross-gabled roof with overhanging eaves terminate in decorative truss verge-boards. Notice the second floor sleeping balcony in the old photo which was popular and considered healthy at the time. Besides the impressive oak entrance foyer and drawing room there are a ballroom, billiard room and a sunroom. …Continue reading “Stimson-Griffiths House – 405 W Highland Drive”