Historic Context Statements

There are two Historic Context Statements about Queen Anne. One covers the period to 1962. The second commissioned by the Queen Anne Historical Society covers the period from 1963 to 2012. It was funded by a generous grant from 4Culture.

Historical Context Statements are called out by the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Historic Preservation as the basic tool underpinning individual and historic district landmark nominations either to local registers or the National Register of Historic Places. …Continue reading “Historic Context Statements”

Chelsea Apartments – 620 W Olympic Pl

The Chelsea Apartments on West Olympic Place were built in 1907 to house visiting families. Then called the “Chelsea Hotel”, it’s charms were widely advertised. One ad, running under the “Room and Board” classification a few years after the Exposition said:

Seattle’s Scenic Hotel Facing Kinnear Park. 10 minutes from business center. High-grade family home; large rooms, magnificent view, excellent neighborhood, roof garden, large lobby, private telephone in all rooms. Single rooms and suites with private bath… Take Kinnear car.

…Continue reading “Chelsea Apartments – 620 W Olympic Pl”

Housing Nurses and Nuns

Children’s, 1949
Children’s Hospital, 1949

It is hard to believe that comparing two Queen Anne buildings constructed to house single women would involve European Renaissance history, the impact of the Protestant rebellion on the Catholic Church and the exploitation of women workers in American hospitals. The buildings are the 1924 Frances Skinner Edris Nursing Home at First Ave. N. and Boston St., adjacent to the original Queen Anne site of Childrens’ Orthopedic Hospital; and the exquisite 1930 Saint Anne Convent at First Ave. W. and W. Comstock.

The historic link between the two buildings can be traced to the Reformation in the 16th century and the spread of Protestantism in Europe. Before the advent of Protestantism, all the nurses in European hospitals were nuns in the Catholic Church. Where Protestants became predominant, Catholic institutions including schools, universities and hospitals were shut down or replaced. The priests, monks and nuns were served in them were dispersed. As Sister Joseph of the Sisters of Providence Order who founded the state’s first hospital made clear, unlike 16th c. Central Europe or England, there was a place in the United States for hospitals associated with the Catholic Church. By the 20th c. in the United States, the women working as nurses in Protestant-managed and secular hospitals were not unlike the nuns they had replaced, single and in need of training and housing. …Continue reading “Housing Nurses and Nuns”