Children’s Home & Cottage – 2142 10th Ave W

Children's Home, 1905
Children’s Home, 1905

The Seattle Children’s Home site on 10th Ave West has been sold and is slated for massive redevelopment with 61 townhouses to occupy the largest undeveloped bit of real estaste on Queen Anne. Lobbying by preservationists may have saved the one historic building on the plot, a building that tells an important story about orphaned and troubled youth has been saved.

McGraw Cottage is the 1905 Colonial Revival style building of the Seattle Children’s Home at the southwest corner of W. McGraw and 10th Ave. W. Although some neighbors rallied around the idea of designating the entire 2.5 acre site and its lush vegetation a city landmark, McGraw Cottage is the only building that survives to document how Seattle has cared for children in need for well over 100 years and the history of women in modern society.

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The Queen Anne Style – Our Neighborhood Namesake

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Ankeny House, 2003

Our Society is frequently asked, “why is our community called Queen Anne?” It does seem strange for a pioneer western city to name its most prominent geographical feature after a relatively obscure 18th century British monarch. The short answer is that we are not named after the Queen, but are in fact named for the architectural style of the first houses built up the south slope of our hill. The longer answer shows how centennials can shape our view of the world.

In the 1870s, in England, architect Richard Norman Shaw introduced the Queen Anne or Free Classic residential design. It was intended to evoke domestic architecture of some 200 years earlier. The British public loved it, perhaps tiring of the demands of empire and nostalgic for a simpler past. …Continue reading “The Queen Anne Style – Our Neighborhood Namesake”

Cobblestone – September 2012

September 2012