Stimson-Griffiths House – 405 W Highland Drive

Stimson-Griffith House, 1905
Stimson-Griffiths House, 1905

Frederick Spencer Stimson was the manager of the Stimson Mill in Ballard and with his brother C.D. Stimson prospered in the lumber business. Fred bought this property on West Highland Drive with a dramatic view of the harbor and began planning an equally substantial house for his family. He liked the English style, as did his neighbors Albert S. Kerry, Harry W. Treat and Charles H. Black. All these men went shopping for an architect and chose Charles Bebb, who designed this three-story house with stucco and half-timbered upper floors rising above a fortress-like stone ground floor punctuated by shingled bays on the south side. The cross-gabled roof with overhanging eaves terminate in decorative truss verge-boards. Notice the second floor sleeping balcony in the old photo which was popular and considered healthy at the time. Besides the impressive oak entrance foyer and drawing room there are a ballroom, billiard room and a sunroom. …Continue reading “Stimson-Griffiths House – 405 W Highland Drive”

The Powerful Georgetown

Queen Anne Connection: The Steam Plant

In the conversations about the Counterbalance and its construction in 1902 by the Seattle Electric Railway, there is little talk about the electricity that powered the line and the company that built the facilities that generated it. While it remains somewhat speculative, there is a good chance that after 1907, when the Seattle Electric Company’s Georgetown Steam Plant finally came on line, some of the electricity powering the streetcars on the Counterbalance and the five other Queen Anne lines came in part from that pioneering steam plant. There is no doubt though that the Seattle Electric Railway and the Seattle Electric Company were both part of Boston-based Stone and Webster, a monopolistic transit engineering firm with branches nationwide. …Continue reading “The Powerful Georgetown”

Working Class Queen Anne

It is hard to imagine Queen Anne as a working class neighborhood. The views from the ridges on the south, east and west sides have attracted large elegant houses built by many of the movers and shakers in city history. Once you leave the ring of elegant aeries though, one-story commercial buildings, a huge quantity of apartment houses and numerous industrial sites on the neighborhood fringe suggest a working class history we don’t want to forget. …Continue reading “Working Class Queen Anne”