Susan Corzatte, Actress

 

Susan Corzatte

On March 21, 1931 in Buffalo, New York, Lillian and Herbert Heinrich welcomed their daughter Susan into the world.  The family spent Susan’s early years in East Aurora, a small village in western New York.  Her mother performed occasionally on stage, and Susan took an early interest in the theater.

Susan began her collegiate education at the University of Rochester, but left when the school cancelled the production of “Pygmalion” with her playing Eliza Doolittle, because school rules did not allow a freshman to perform a lead role.   She then transferred to Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois.  When she graduated, she followed a professor’s advice and joined the apprentice program of the Cleveland Playhouse in Cleveland, Ohio.  She identified herself in her performances as Susan Ludlow.

At Cleveland Playhouse in 1955 she met Clayton Corzatte (3/1927–4/2013), as they both appeared in “The Remarkable Mr. Pennypacker.”  Susan and Clayton – AKA “Clay” — married in 1957, and soon moved to New York City.
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Carolyn Geise, Architect and Community-Builder

Carolyn in a recent photo

A Queen Anne resident since 1980, architect Carolyn Geise has designed homes and housing in Seattle neighborhoods including Queen Anne. A professional activist since her UW architecture student days, when she staffed the American Institute of Architects (AIA Seattle) booth at the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair, she has taken an active role in neighborhood planning and community development, in and beyond Seattle’s Belltown community.

Born in Olympia as Carolyn Lee Deuter, by age 27 she had climbed Mount Rainier three times, and had worked as a popular cook at Snoqualmie Lodge and as a ski instructor with climbing legend Jim Whittaker. She married and later divorced Jonn Geise, father of their son Matt Geise. …Continue reading “Carolyn Geise, Architect and Community-Builder”

Looking at Queen Anne’s Modern Sites

Modern Tour Poster, 2015

On June 20th the Queen Anne Historical Society provided it’s second modern tour. The Modern Tour started with a presentation by Jeff Murdock. Murdock is currently serving his second term on the City of Seattle Landmarks Preservation Board and Architectural Review Committee. Murdock presented the Queen Anne Pool, which was designed by Benjamin McAdoo & Co and completed in 1978. Murdock explained that the “construction of the building was controversial because it required the purchase and removal of ten homes, making it the most expensive Seattle Parks pool at $1.25 million.” The pool was a project in the second phase of McAdoo’s career and Murdock believes “his influence as an African American architect and activist for social change was significant in national as well as local contexts.” …Continue reading “Looking at Queen Anne’s Modern Sites”