Our newest city landmark: Edris Skinner Nurses Home

Queen Anne has a new City of Seattle landmark. On Wednesday, May 16, the Landmarks Preservation Board (LPB) voted to designate the Edris Skinner Nurses Home at the corner of Boston Street and First Avenue North a Seattle landmark. Congratulations to Brian Regan, the property owner and future developer of the block-long site, who prepared the nomination that you can find in the list here: http://www.seattle.gov/neighborhoods/programs-and-services/historic-preservation/landmarks#currentnomination. The decision now goes to the City Council which is sure to vote for designation. …Continue reading “Our newest city landmark: Edris Skinner Nurses Home”

Endorsing Landmark Designation of Edris Skinner Nurses Home

The Queen Anne Historical Society continues its active support of the city’s landmark processes with this email sent May 15, 2018 to the Landmarks Preservation Board prior to its deliberation on May 16 of the designation of the Edris Skinner Nurses Home on the campus of the former Seattle Children’s Orthopedic Hospital once located on Queen Anne Hill.

Dear members of the Landmarks Preservation Board:

Due to unexpected conflicts and with apologies for the tardiness of this message, the Queen Anne Historical Society enthusiastically endorses the designation of the Edris Skinner Nurses Home which will be before the Landmarks Preservation Board tomorrow May 16, 2018. In our opinion the Edris Skinner Nurses Home meets five designation criteria. A, B, C, D. and F.

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Historic Preservation and the Illogical Dangers of Hyperbole

I prepared this article in response to a misleading article published on December 22, by the Sightline Institute. A link to the article appears below. Today, January 17, 2018, the Landmarks Preservation Board (LPB) voted not to impose Controls and Incentives on the Wayne Apartment the recently landmarked building discussed by Mr. Bertolet and me. The vote effectively makes my arguments weaker. Even though the building is part of Belltown, I share the article so as to give our readers a sense of the obstacles we face protecting the historic fabric of Queen Anne.

The LPB’s vote is the result of the property owner’s claim that preserving the building would be an economic hardship. It frees the property owner to sell the building with nothing in the way of its demolition. Part of the argument for the vote, which resulted from a rigorous review of all the options by the staff of the city’s Preservation Program and its recommendation to oppose Controls and Incentives that might have protected the building from demolition, rested on the huge disparity between the amount of money owners could realize from selling the Wayne and the cost of repairing and restoring it. It is a very dangerous argument in this time of incredibly high land values throughout the city. The Queen Anne Historical Society plans to begin redrafting the landmark ordinance in cooperation with other preservation organizations and lobbying the city council and the mayor for its eventual adoption, so stay tuned.
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